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OhioTom76

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OhioTom76 last won the day on January 28 2014

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About OhioTom76

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    CSS
  1. I generally pay yearly because I've been using the same host for a number of years and already know what to expect from them. Plus if I can get a discount for paying the year in full, why not. I don't like having a bunch of recurring monthly payments scheduled because when it comes time for me to switch banks or switch a credit card, if you miss some of them, it can cause mayhem with bounced charges and insufficient funds fees. I've been through that mess a number of times, never again.
  2. You can get hosting with a more reliable company such as Bluehost for less than $5 per month, plus they include a free domain for the first year. I personally wouldn't take any chances for anything cheaper than that, particularly when it comes to uptime, support and overall features. $50-$60 per year is not much at all. There are lots of hosts popping up that are just resellers and affiliates for larger companies - they are more or less fake store fronts and once they get your sale, you are passed along to the actual web host. Plus those bargain packages almost always have hidden fees baked into the fine print, especially when it comes time for renewal. In many cases, the 2nd year is probably much more expensive, and on top of that, they will auto renew you months before your hosting plan expires, causing a large charge to hit your cards when you don't expect it.
  3. They don't offer a whole lot of information but based on the limited stuff they do mention faster hosting for Wordpress installations - which seems to have become a problem with traditional entry level hosting packages, which Wordpress runs rather slow on. Almost every site I've set up for clients recently using Wordpress we've had to upgrade the hosting to get some reasonable speeds, otherwise it was taking several seconds for a page to load - even with an out of the box installation and very few plugins. They also mention Wordpress specific support, which I don't believe their standard support really helped out much with in the past. Previously, if you installed Wordpress yourself they wouldn't provide any support. You had to install it via their control panel to get any support, but even that was very limited. Most of the time they would just recommend you uninstall and reinstall it via the CP. They also tout some Wordpress specific security features, and better handling of traffic spikes.
  4. In all fairness I haven't worked a whole lot with Vimeo to learn all of it's features and functionality. I'm kind of leaning towards Youtube at this point in time though for several reasons. I like that Youtube can automatically stream the video at a variety of compression levels, without me having to do all that conversion processing on my end. Vimeo tends to only stream high quality video from what I can see, which may not load well for people on slower or limited connections. Also, Youtube has native mobile apps that many people already have installed, which gives it an edge over Vimeo. On the other hand, Google is much more aggressive with auto censoring stuff on Youtube, whereas on Vimeo more content can get through and not be blocked. Often times Youtube's automated filtering can be too sensitive and generate a lot of false positives. Another advantage to Vimeo is if you don't want the video content necessarily associated with your Google account. Perhaps you are uploading something funny or risque but don't want it appearing associated with your Google profile indefinitely down the road.
  5. These online tools can come in handy, especially as opposed to buying a desktop app, which you may only need to use once in a blue moon. One other option I wanted to mention would be to use Google Web Fonts and their pre-built styles. I just discovered this option recently, buried away in their documentation. Scroll down the page in the link below to see some examples of the visual styles you can achieve: https://developers.google.com/fonts/docs/getting_started#Quick_Start Even better, because you are using actual HTML text, it makes your "logo" even more search engine friendly. Now if only Google would start adding some icon fonts to their Google Web Font collection, this would be even better.
  6. The "Golden Ratio" is a design concept that supposedly has a very long history, and it's speculated it was used in many things ranging from Roman architecture to the Mona Lisa. It's also commonly used among designers these days as well. Creative Bloq had an interesting article that goes into more detail about it, it's history and how to use it in your existing designs. http://www.creativebloq.com/design/designers-guide-golden-ratio-12121546 While the article walks you through how to create a "golden ratio" template in Illustrator, they didn't mention that Photoshop actually has this already built into it. Newer versions of Photoshop (I believe CS6 and CC) have it tucked away within the newer Crop tool. Look at the toolbar up top, and you will find a drop down that has the Golden Ratio listed in it. Alternately you can hit the "O" key on your keyboard to toggle through all the cropping templates, and "Shift+O" to change the orientation of some of them.
  7. I just noticed this the other day, I have several test installations of Wordpress on my server for some projects I am working on. Out of the blue I get an email telling me one of them has updated to the latest version of Wordpress. Immediately I am thinking someone somehow got a hold of my login or something like that because I never updated it. Then moments later I get notifications from my other installations as well. Apparently Wordpress is now just updating on it's own. This is so frustrating considering I may not want to update some live sites if there are some outstanding compatibility issues with my plugins and themes that haven't been worked out yet. Anyone know how to turn this off?
  8. For example, if you needed to do a batch search for some lines of code through several hundred files, good luck accomplishing that with Notepad - in Dreamweaver it can be done in several seconds. It also has tools to simulate your web page in a variety of desktop and mobile devices, can't do that in Notepad either. It has FTP and file management tools to publish your site directly from within it, can't do that with Notepad. It has pre built templates for responsive Grids that you can customize which gives you a solid head start on projects, in Notepad you would have to write that all from scratch each time.
  9. OhioTom76

    Digg.com

    Admittedly I kind of quit reading Digg right around the time of their redesign. I mainly viewed their articles through a widget on my IGoogle page, but when they stopped supporting that, I couldn't be bothered to go directly to their site on my own. The new layout is OK, but I don't like all the extra space it takes up with images. I much rather preferred the compact list of article titles that I could scan over quickly without having to scroll like crazy down the page. Now they show too much of a preview for each individual article, which makes it a chore to scan the page.
  10. Lenovo has started to surpass HP as one of the leading computer manufacturers out there, which is a pretty big deal considering just a few years ago they weren't really a household name - the space was largely dominated by HP, Dell and Sony. This is very cool of him to do. Both my desktop and laptop are Lenovo and I've been very pleased with both. Their systems just give you more bang for your buck. I read somewhere that they run on much thinner profit margins, emphasizing quality in their products rather than cheap parts to make bigger profits.
  11. 1.) Click Fraud - though this doesn't get talked about as much these days, it certainly still happens, and can blow your budget and tank your conversions. It's also rather cumbersome to catch it and report it. 2.) Working for bosses that know nothing about Internet Marketing but try to micromanage everything you are doing. I had a boss that didn't know squat about the ins and outs of Pay Per Click marketing, and was forcing me to do all sorts of things to my accounts that were causing them to perform poorly, then he would turn around and blame it all on me when they tanked. 3.) Merging and Reconciling Data From Multiple Sources - this can be a huge headache, when you are trying to match up in house reporting with reporting from the search engines. Often times the people running your in house reports have no concept of the metrics and business rules around third party services, and they will have measures that sound the same but are entirely different. For example, our internal reporting at one job tracked what it called "clicks", which were actually "visits" and in no way related to "clicks" in Google AdWords reporting. 4.) SEM/SEO tools that promise the world, but never deliver. Then you wind up in a war of words between the salespeople for these products and your boss, who is convinced everything they are saying is true, when they are often exaggerating their benefits just to close a sale and make a commission. 5.) Dealing with Display Networks such as running ads on Google AdSense. This is a constant game of whack a mole, as there are thousands of low quality sites you constantly have to be on the lookout for to block, otherwise they will waste your budget.
  12. Glad to hear your computer wasn't a complete loss. As for brands, I would recommend checking out Lenovo's systems. Their Thinkpad systems are built really well, but even their entry level systems give you more bang for your buck than HP's and Dells do. I picked up a cheap $300 HP system about a year and a half ago, and took it back within a week because the fan started running insanely loud. I exchanged it for a $350 Lenovo entry level laptop instead and it was way nicer. I wished I would have just went with it in the first place.
  13. I can't recall if my monitor is 27" or 32", it's one of the two - it's rather big in general. I am totally spoiled by it and I don't think I could every go back to a small screen. It's why I seldom use my laptop anymore. It's so nice to have all the extra room to push things off to the sides of the screen when I am working on a project. Often times I will have a calculator off to one side, notepad off to the other side, and my main app in the center. It's also nice to be able to take breaks and watch movies on it in the same room - so I can use it like a TV too.
  14. If they started selling all in one systems that I could build my own computer with I would consider it. Perhaps they already do sell something like that but I just haven't seen it yet. I would be looking for something like a monitor with a streamlined case in the back that I could insert the rest of the computers parts. I don't think I would ever go back to the old tower systems that take up so much space and have all sorts of wires sticking out all over the place.
  15. Mobility is nice, but one of my biggest concerns is comfort and ease of use. I cannot stand doing design work on a small laptop monitor, which is why I really prefer a nice large monitor on a desktop system. It's so much easier on the eyes, and I have plenty of space to arrange all my menus and panels within a a program such as Phtotoshop or Dreamweaver. Also, I need a full keyboard and a dedicated mouse. I cannot get work done on a trackpad, particularly when working with graphics.
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