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W7*64, i need to use atleast 3gb of ram for apps, cant use large address flag on


surrealifeIV
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hello. What i would like to accomplish is the following. with *32 bit os, a large address flag is used to allow the ram to apply 3gb towards apps, and 1gb for the os. on a 64* sys it is done by changing the binnariy values. so, i can get the same 3/1 performance, or more. i have done some research, have ?'s. can i change a single app,(fallout) in "regedit.exe) i t shows binary values, and has window to change, unfamiliar with it though. or the real way is "BCC", and i have gone into the command lines, have trouble getting commands to be acceptted<re: my input no good:) > also, my mb is an msi x58 pro-e, have NEVER updated the bios, they have so little support for *64.  also, i know currently 12gb ram is wasted, but, is there something i can do w/ a virtual memmory cache of say 9gb? i would hope, last ?, would giving fallouts cmd kernal a boost help. thanks, there is just know real great help, learning lots, but spent way too much time on this one. just people asking same ?, what good is x amount of ram on w7 if still can apply only 1gb. and does ultimate have better ram use, lastly before you get too bored, i have vista, but it also is *64, so...same deal huh. thanks for any help, ill get you an e-beer. peace

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So how much RAM do you have in your system at the moment?

And x58 mobo's are designed for 64 bit because they have the socket for the i7's with triple channel memory and most people put 6GB of RAM in their x58 setup (3x2GB).

Like Thrill said if you want the most out of your RAM the best thing to do is install a 64bit OS and flash your BIOS if its out of date.

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hi, sorry I wasn't clear. the pic shows it. i am running 12gb ram, and am running w7 home prem 64.  yes, i am dying to flash my bios, (sounds kinky) but msi "live update etc, is only w7 32, i believe...i did just dl a zip, want to solve this first/bacup. thanks guys for responding

charles

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When I flashed my BIOS I downloaded the necessary files, then put them on a USB stick, then I had to push something like F8 during the POST screen that took me into a flashing utility outside of windows so 32 bit or 64 bit it didn't matter. Does your motherboard have this capability?

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Oh right, you're running a 64bit OS. Seemed that you couldn't run a 64bit OS because of your motherboard, oops. Motherboard mostly have an onboard utility that lets you update your BIOS easier, just by popping the BIOS file on a USB stick and then loading it. I know for sure Gigabyte does have some form of software.

 

What motherboard do you have? :)

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Shauno/Thrill, thanks guys. K, i have msi x58pro-e, w7 hprm 64*, 12gb ram, I7. msi has a live bios flash (use at own risk) but is for 32* . the latest bios vrsion, has no readme for w7, 7522v8x ... but i believe i can use the usb style. OR? can i go into regedit, bring up the app, and adjust the binaries, so it asks for more ram? or do i go into binary command code, and make it = a 32* 3gb large address flag. thanks...you guys know your stuff.

charles

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cmon, i need moRE POWER, kiddin. 64 w7/ 12gb ram, MB is msi pro 58x-e suppots everything, just, the world isn't all 64, i have the binary flash, but this 1st. 32 bit sys you would use a large address flag(LAF), 64, it is done through binary cmd code(BCd), this allows coesion w/ 32*dll's, from MS The boot configuration data store (BCD) contains boot configuration parameters and controls how the operating system is booted for Windows Vista® and later versions. With earlier versions of Windows®, the way in which boot configuration data was handled depended on the system’s firmware:

For BIOS-based systems, boot configuration data was contained in a text file named Boot.ini.

For Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI)–based systems, boot configuration data was contained in nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM).

 

BCD abstracts the underlying firmware and provides a common programming interface that can be used to manipulate the boot environment for all systems running Windows Vista or later versions of Windows. Every such system has a system BCD store that contains the data that controls the boot environment. Systems can have additional BCD stores, but only one store at a time can be designated as the system store.

Unlike Boot.ini, BCD stores data in a binary format and cannot be edited with a text editor. Instead, Windows Vista provides several ways to access a computer’s BCD stores:

The Windows Vista user interface (UI)

MSConfig and the Shell’s Control Panel System application provide end users with access to a limited subset of the data in the BCD system store, including the Windows Boot Manager’s time-out setting, and the debug and safe-mode settings.

BCDEdit

BCDEdit is a command-line editor—included with Windows Vista and later versions—that provides complete access to all BCD stores on the system. BCDEdit can be used to create or delete BCD data stores, designate a new system store, and add, delete, or modify the data in an individual store.

The BCD Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) provider

This component exposes an API that provides management tools with complete access to all BCD stores on the system.with this process, i can get the list up, other cmds not accepted, maybe my language...written, not my swearing, anyone out there help me. cant stand having the govenor on:) haven't really got into creating data stores yet .

 

thanks

 

c.s.

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Have you tried updating BIOS from inside Windows? I don't really reccomend it, but you want to be upgrading your BIOS not manually editing binary values.

 

I've attached your latest BIOS version (it also has a readme in it, so read it!).

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thanks for letting me waste your time.thrill, thanks for the file, i wrote that i had version x..wtf? e is the right one. readme says not to flash if all is good, but, i really should, just wanted to learn all i could while i had you guys...so thanks again. s, the live thing lets you test mb settings, using a small amt of ram, i havn't got into it yet, changing binary values looks ok, has window etc, just, have no refrence.  guess i'll just save all my crap on another hdd, and try it out....thats how we learn. peace                         

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hi people. had to take care of some family things...back to project. Thrill,shauno, all right, read me for Bios v-e talks alot about w 98, 2000..etc and "floppy" 36, and i barely remember those... so, usb flash option says extract, and put main file, being "afud4310". then, gotta go to command line.k, DOS, F: prompt (usb is f) works, F:>  MSI says type line cmd F:>cd<space>xxxxvxx(docname)=afud4310<enter>  ...that works, leaves me F:\ i think, next cmd from MSI is F:\xxxxvxx>afud4234<space>axxxxims.xxx(bios)<enter>

 

then reboot when prompted.  xxxxvxx is not a valid syntax, nor is afud4234 alone. it took the xxxxvxx in the previous line? also it hasn't gotten there, but (bios) would be ? the version that flashes at the speed of light at startup? and that line is the replacement , or do i put in the new bios (afud4310) at that point. thanks

c.s.

********READ ME    Reflash BIOS by USB Disk Under DOS Mode Procdure

 

1. Know your model number

a. Open your case and look for the MS-XXXX number on the motherboard between the PCI slots, also check the version number that is written there as well. (Some motherboards are named like P45 Diamond; make sure you have the right version number)

 

b. Boot up your system & take a look at the top left screen during POST, you should see something like “A7516IMS V1.4 082708” This means the board is MS-7516 with BIOS version 1.4

Hint: Many systems are clearing this message very fast, the bios version is then unreadable, and you can either press “PAUSE” or disable the “Quick Boot” in the BIOS setup.

 

2. Download the BIOS that matches your motherboard AND version number (some motherboards are named like P45 Diamond; make sure you have the right version number) to your USB devise. BIOS can be found according to the CPU type of your board like if your CPU is Intel 775 type then look here

http://global.msi.com.tw/index.php?func=prodpage2&maincat_no=1&cat2_no=170

 

3. Extract the BIOS-archive that you have downloaded by double clicking to bootable USB device.

 

4. Boot your system from a USB device

 

5. When you get the DOS prompt, type the following sequence:

(assuming USB Flash drive uses F:/ (F Prompt)

F:>cd<space> XXXXVXX(document name) <enter>

F:\XXXXVXX>afud4234<space>AXXXXIMS.XXX(bios name) <enter>

 

6. Reboot your system when prompted

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found the material, in a random refrence. type w7 ram on google...nothing but more?'s, so, hope this helps, i havn't read the DL yet, but the info should be in there.

BCDEdit Commands for Boot Environment

Differences in Addressable Memory.    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463064.aspx

 

 

"The first thing most developers notice is that 64-bit processors provide a huge leap in the amount of physical and virtual memory that can be addressed.

 

32-bit applications on 32-bit platforms can address up to 2 GB

 

32-bit applications built with the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE:YES linker flag on 32-bit Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 with the special /3gb boot option can address up to 3 GB. This constrains the kernel to only 1 GB which may cause some drivers and/or services to fail.

 

32-bit applications built with the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE:YES linker flag on the 32-bit editions of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, and Windows 7 can address memory up to the number specified by the boot configuration data (BCD) element IncreaseUserVa. IncreaseUserVa can have a value ranging from 2048, the default, to 3072 (which matches the amount of memory configured by the /3gb boot option on Windows XP). The remainder of 4 GB is allocated to the kernel and can result in failing driver and service configurations

 

Pointer Truncation

 

Pointers are 64-bits on a 64-bit OS, so casting pointers to other data types can result in truncation, and pointer arithmetic can result in corruption. Using the /Wp64 flag will usually provide a warning about this kind of issue, but using polymorphic types (INT_PTR, DWORD_PTR, SIZE_T, UINT_PTR, and so on) when casting pointer types is a good practice to help avoid this issue altogether. Since pointers are 64-bit on new platforms, developers should check the ordering of pointers, and the data types in classes and structures, to reduce or eliminate padding.

 

Data Types and Binary Files

 

While pointers increase from 32 bits to 64 on a 64-bit platform, other data types don't. Fixed-precision data types (DWORD32, DWORD64, INT32, INT64, LONG32, LONG64, UINT32, UINT64) can be used in places where the size of the data type must be known; for example, in a binary file structure. The changes in pointer size and data alignment require special handling to ensure 32-bit-to-64-bit compatibility."

(ref)MS. large address flag etc.

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whenever you read through, this is the list of arguments for bcedit:

 

Windows Boot Manager

The following table lists the types that apply only to Windows Boot Manager. They can be used in addition to the standard boot applications types.

 

Data type name Format Description  

Boot  

BOOTSEQUENCE list A space-separated list of identifiers that defines a one-time boot sequence.  

DEFAULT id The default boot entry identifier.  

TIMEOUT integer The Boot Manager’s wait time, in seconds, after which Boot Manager selects the default boot entry.  

Resume  

RESUME Boolean TRUE indicates that a resume operation should be attempted.  

RESUMEOBJECT id The resume application identifier.  

Display  

DISPLAYBOOTMENU Boolean TRUE enables the boot menu display.  

DISPLAYORDER list A space-separated list of identifiers that defines Boot Manager’s display order.  

TOOLSDISPLAYORDER list A space-separated list of identifiers that defines the Boot Manager tools display order.

 

Windows Boot Loader

The types in the following table can be used only for Windows boot loader entries. They can be used in addition to the standard boot application types.

 

Data type name Format Description  

Boot types  

BOOTLOG Boolean TRUE enables the system initialization log.  

BOOTSTATUSPOLICY enum Boot status policy: DISPLAYALLFAILURES, IGNOREALLFAILURES, IGNORESHUTDOWNFAILURES, or IGNOREBOOTFAILURES.  

LASTKNOWNGOOD Boolean TRUE enables the system to boot to the last known good configuration.  

NOCRASHAUTOREBOOT Boolean TRUE disables automatic restart on crash.  

QUIETBOOT Boolean TRUE disables the boot screen display.  

RESUMEOBJECT id The identifier for the resume application that is associated with this operating system.  

SAFEBOOT enum The safe boot option: MINIMAL, NETWORK, or DSREPAIR.  

SAFEBOOTALTERNATESHELL Boolean TRUE specifies that the alternate shell should be used when the system is booted into Safe mode.  

STAMPDISK Boolean Enables stamping of RAW disks during a WinPE boot.

Available only on Windows Server 2008 Beta 3 and later.  

SOS Boolean TRUE displays additional boot information.  

WINPE Boolean TRUE enables the computer to boot to WinPE.  

Debugging and performance types  

DBGTRANSPORT string The file name for a private debugger transport.  

DEBUG Boolean TRUE enables kernel debugging.  

PERFMEM integer The size, in megabytes, of the buffer to be allocated for performance data logging.  

Drivers, kernel, and system root types  

DRIVERLOADFAILUREPOLICY enum Driver load failure policy: FATAL or USEERRORCONTROL.  

EMS Boolean TRUE enables kernel EMS.  

KERNEL string The file name for a private kernel.  

OSDEVICE device The device that contains the system root.  

SYSTEMROOT string The fully-qualified path to the system root folder. It cannot contain environment variables.  

Hardware abstraction layer (HAL) types  

DETECTHAL Boolean TRUE enables HAL and kernel detection.  

HAL string The file name for a private HAL.  

HALBREAKPOINT Boolean TRUE enables the special HAL breakpoint.  

KERNEL string The file name for a private kernel.  

Memory types  

INCREASEUSERVA integer The size of the user-mode address space for 32-bit versions of Windows. The default value is 2 GB. To specify a larger value, set INCREASEUSERVA to the size of the address space, in MB. The valid range for INCREASEUSERVA is 2048 to 3072. This data type is not used for 64-bit versions of Windows.   NOLOWMEM Boolean TRUE disables the use of low memory.  

NX enum NX options: OPTIN, OPTOUT, ALWAYSON, or ALWAYSOFF.  

PAE enum PAE options: DEFAULT, FORCEENABLE, or FORCEDISABLE.  

REMOVEMEMORY integer The amount of memory to be removed from the total memory available to Windows.  

Options  

ADVANCEDOPTIONS Boolean TRUE enables advanced options.  

LOADOPTIONS string Any additional load options that are not covered by other data types.  

OPTIONSEDIT Boolean TRUE enables the options editor.  

Processors and APICs types  

CLUSTERMODEADDRESSING integer The maximum number of processors to include in a single Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller (APIC) cluster.  

CONFIGFLAGS integer Processor-specific configuration flags.  

MAXPROC Boolean TRUE reports the maximum number of processors in the system.  

NUMPROC integer The number of processors to be used.  

ONECPU Boolean TRUE forces only the boot CPU to be used.  

RESTRICTAPICCLUSTER integer The largest APIC cluster number that the system can use.  

USEPHYSICALDESTINATION Boolean TRUE forces the physical APIC to be used.  

VESA, PCI, and VGA types  

MSI enum Message signaled interrupt (MSI) settings: DEFAULT or FORCEDISABLE.  

USEFIRMWAREPCISETTINGS Boolean TRUE uses BIOS-configured PCI resources.  

VGA Boolean TRUE forces the VGA display driver to be used.

 

Memory Diagnostic Application

The types in the following table apply only to memory diagnostic application boot entries. They can be used in addition to the standard boot application types.

 

Data type name Format Description  

PASSCOUNT integer The number of iterations that to run.  

TESTMIX enum The text mix: BASIC or EXTENDED.

 

Resume Application

The types in the following table apply to boot entries for the resume application. Boot application types can also apply to boot entries for the resume application.

Resume Application Types

 

Type name Format Description  

Hibernation file  

FILEDEVICE device The device that contains the hibernation file.  

FILEPATH string The path of the hibernation file.  

Other  

ASSOCIATEDOSDEVICE device A Microsoft MS-DOS® device with a resume application.  

CUSTOMSETTINGS Boolean TRUE allows resume loader to use custom settings.  

PAE enum PAE settings: DEFAULT, FORCEENABLE, or FORCEDISABLE.

 

great... for you people with 32* os....what about us? i did refrence this from MS 64* os info

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hi. yep, kinda funny, im an idiot...w& 64 it uses all the installed RAM, thas why i couldnt find what i wanted....it was already done. learned alot...again, stuff i will not need.

 

take care

c.s.

 

ME:Ihave 12gb g-skill ddr-3 w/ I7, on an msi x58proe mb, what i REALLy want to do is run 3gb of ram for games(programs) and 1gb ram for the os. in my research, i have learned all about how to do this on a 32* system. bcdedit, and large address flags, multiple forums, NO ONE can get me this information? i have researched MS system info for programmers 64*, was 2009 material? just can't find information. and i increased pae file to just over 3gb, not sure if that really does anything? Brillliant idea calling my memmory people, you must know how i can do this? i'll send you a copy of my dxdiag . thanks, any help would be great, i am dying to use more than 15%. flawless performance, thanks again

Gskl:Dear Customer

 

I don't quite understand your target. If you have 12GB installed, there should already be more than 3GB.

 

Thank you

GSKILL SUPPORT

 

Dear Customer

 

There is no limitation for Win 7* 64, that is why there is no place to configure that setting.

 

Thank you

GSKILL SUPPORT

 

 

 

ME: FKNRIGHT man like it.

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guys hi, was talking about useable RAM per application IE: i have 12gb, Fallout NV is 4.5gb, i can still only "throw" 1.3gb, i want to run the ENTIRE game in my RAM. i do have 8.5gb of mods also, but the problem remains, even if i had 6gb of RAM, w7 right now would use 1.3 on Fallout ...or any game....wasting 10gb+ just sitting at idle :'(

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hi, forgot the example. in the 2.5 mil nexus mod community, there are 2 mods. one is a 3gb enabler, the other is a 4gb enabler, note, 6gb and 8gb supposedly on the way. this began my research. the 3gb enabler, works well, for 32* systems, i have illustrated the processs in my earlier posts. the 3 and 4gb enablers worked only for a short time, steam issues. these process are for a 32* system done by "Limits on memory and address space vary by platform, operating system, and by whether the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE value of the LOADED_IMAGE structure and 4-gigabyte tuning (4GT) are in use. IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE is set or cleared by using the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE linker option, also leading you to Bcdedit arguments 

INCREASEUSERVA integer The size of the user-mode address space for 32-bit versions of Windows. The default value is 2 GB. To specify a larger value, set INCREASEUSERVA to the size of the address space, in MB. The valid range for INCREASEUSERVA is 2048 to 3072. This data type is not used for 64-bit versions of Windows. that line is a direct quotation...DOES NOT WORK ON 64* systems.

So, i am left to research further at the software level, or messing with registry values, and my favorite....64 downchanneling to 32*Dll's. You all realize that even with 128GB ram, on w7 32* or 64* you really are only working with 4gb. "stock" is 3gb os, 1gb apps, that is why all numerical refrences are relatively tiny "The valid range for INCREASEUSERVA is 2048 to 3072" so, THE BEST anyone can do is very close to the same on either system, different techniques...SAME results...1gb for the os, and 3gb for games/apps. junk! that is why we are trying to enable these enablers.lol all of this...even the hardware, is for the games...just want to use it all to its full potential. Any help would be great!  thanks ahead

 

c.s.

 

Resources

Boot Configuration Data in Windows Vista

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=93005

BCD Reference

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=93006

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this is what we all are working with

 

 

Memory and Address Space Limits

The following table specifies the limits on memory and address space for supported releases of Windows. Unless otherwise noted, the limits in this table apply to all supported releases.

 

Memory type Limit in on X86 Limit in 64-bit Windows

User-mode virtual address space for each 32-bit process

2 GB

 

Up to 3 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE and 4GT

2 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE cleared (default)

 

4 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE set

 

User-mode virtual address space for each 64-bit process

Not applicable

With IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE set (default):

 

 

x64:  8 TB

Intel IPF:  7 TB

2 GB with IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE cleared

 

Kernel-mode virtual address space

2 GB

 

From 1 GB to a maximum of 2 GB with 4GT

8 TB

 

Paged pool

Limited by available kernel-mode virtual address space or the PagedPoolLimit registry key value.

 

Windows Vista and above:  Limited only by kernel mode virtual address space. Starting with Windows Vista with Service Pack 1 (SP1), the paged pool can also be limited by the PagedPoolLimit registry key value.

Windows Home Server and Windows Server 2003:  530 MB

Windows XP:  490 MB

Windows 2000:  350 MB 128 GB

 

Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP:  Up to 128 GB depending on configuration and RAM.

Windows 2000:  Not applicable

Nonpaged pool

Limited by available kernel-mode virtual address space, the NonPagedPoolLimit registry key value, or physical memory.

 

Windows Vista:  Limited only by kernel mode virtual address space and physical memory. Starting with Windows Vista with SP1, the nonpaged pool can also be limited by the NonPagedPoolLimit registry key value.

Windows Home Server, Windows Server 2003, and Windows XP/2000:  256 MB, or 128 MB with 4GT. 75% of RAM up to a maximum of 128 GB

 

Windows Vista:  40% of RAM up to a maximum of 128 GB.

Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP:  Up to 128 GB depending on configuration and RAM.

Windows 2000:  Not applicable

System cache virtual address space (physical size limited only by physical memory)

Limited by available kernel-mode virtual address space or the SystemCacheLimit registry key value.

 

 

Windows Vista:  Limited only by kernel mode virtual address space. Starting with Windows Vista with SP1, system cache virtual address space can also be limited by the SystemCacheLimit registry key value.

Windows Home Server, Windows Server 2003, and Windows XP/2000:  860 MB with LargeSystemCache registry key set and without 4GT; up to 448 MB with 4GT. Always 1 TB regardless of physical RAM

 

Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP:  Up to 1 TB depending on configuration and RAM.

Windows 2000:  Not applicable

 

 

Physical Memory Limits: Windows 7

The following table specifies the limits on physical memory for Windows 7.

 

Version Limit on X86 Limit on X64

Windows 7 Ultimate 4 GB

192 GB

 

Windows 7 Enterprise 4 GB

192 GB

 

Windows 7 Professional 4 GB

192 GB

 

Windows 7 Home Premium 4 GB

16 GB

 

Windows 7 Home Basic 4 GB

8 GB

 

Windows 7 Starter 2 GB

2 GB

 

Physical Memory Limits: Windows Server 2008 R2

The following table specifies the limits on physical memory for Windows Server 2008 R2. Windows Server 2008 R2 is available only in 64-bit editions.

 

Version Limit on X64 Limit on IA64

Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter 2 TB

 

Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise 2 TB

 

Windows Server 2008 R2 for Itanium-Based Systems  2 TB

 

Windows Server 2008 R2 Foundation 8 GB

 

Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard 32 GB

 

Windows HPC Server 2008 R2  128 GB

 

Windows Web Server 2008 R2 32 GB

 

 

Physical Memory Limits: Windows Server 2008

The following table specifies the limits on physical memory for Windows Server 2008. Limits greater than 4 GB for 32-bit Windows assume that PAE is enabled.

 

Version Limit on X86 Limit on X64 Limit on IA64

Windows Server 2008 Datacenter 64 GB

1 TB

 

Windows Server 2008 Enterprise 64 GB

1 TB

 

Windows Server 2008 HPC Edition  128 GB

 

Windows Server 2008 Standard 4 GB

32 GB

 

Windows Server 2008 for Itanium-Based Systems  2 TB

 

Windows Small Business Server 2008  4 GB

32 GB

 

Windows Web Server 2008 4 GB

32 GB

 

 

 

 

Physical Memory Limits: Windows Vista

The following table specifies the limits on physical memory for Windows Vista.

 

Version Limit on X86 Limit on X64

Windows Vista Ultimate 4 GB

128 GB

 

Windows Vista Enterprise 4 GB

128 GB

 

Windows Vista Business 4 GB

128 GB

 

Windows Vista Home Premium 4 GB

16 GB

 

Windows Vista Home Basic 4 GB

8 GB

 

Windows Vista Starter 1 GB

 

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this is what i'm getting into now, just found it....need coffee. IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE

0x0020 The application can handle addresses larger than 2 GB.The /3GB switch makes a full 3 GB of virtual address space available to applications and reduces the amount available to the system to 1 GB. On Windows Server 2003, the amount of address space available to applications can be adjusted by setting the /USERVA switch in Boot.ini to a value between 2048 and 3072, which increases the amount of address space available to the system. This can help maintain overall system performance when the application requires more than 2 GB but less than 3 GB of address space.

To enable an application to use the larger address space, set the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE flag in the image header. The linker included with Microsoft Visual C++ supports the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE switch to set this flag. Setting this flag and then running the application on a system that does not have 4GT support should not affect the application.

 

On 64-bit editions of Windows, 32-bit applications marked with the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE flag have 4 GB of address space available

 

this uses pointers for the .32dll  kinda like laf

 

alright, mine is a bit different(pic) but i found the physical address, should be done soon.

 

anyone?

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ok. hi. i am going to assume the binary value, 0000 01 000 is the 1gb default. so, i have changed the value already to 3.='s 3gb. it refreshed my regpage, and is registering value of 3. and i am still typing. so, i am going to restart, if you do NOT hear from me in a few.....DON"T DO IT. also. if this is correct. you should probablly use a value of 2, giving a stable 2gb for the os, and 2gb for your apps.

 

this is fun...you love this stuff

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