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Negative effects of increasing CPU fan speed?


Scotteh
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Hai.

 

So I made my own computer a while back now, and everything seems to be running great, apart from one or two things.

 

One of those things is the CPU temperature, I have a Intel i7-2600 LGA1155 and the stock cooler that came with it is just awful! It can't handle it. On boot it starts at 29-35°C, which yeah is good. When I run some games it goes straight up to 55-60°C, which is still decent. But when I run my minecraft server and play minecraft at the same time, or play on another CPU intensive game such as Dead Rising 2, it goes up to :)-90°c which worries me.

 

I wonder if banging up the fan speed via BIOS (Or any software recommended) will aid my problem?

 

This all seems well and good but wouldn't the fan speed being high all the time cause any damage? Because if not wouldn't they have it high on default anyway?

 

What speed should I have it at? I'm not sure what it's at now, just default. I'll check if and when I get a post here telling me the benefits and disadvantages.

 

My power supply is 700W if this helps.

 

Thank-you in advance.

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Well first off I have my fans running max all the time to keep the system as cool as possible, there is no negative effects from doing this that I know of or have ever read about, to be honest it is better to keep the CPU as cool as possible to increase its life. To run the fan at max just go into the BIOS and look for the heading PC health (or something like that) and turn automatic fan to disabled, you could also (unless already enabled) enable intel speed step C1E, which lowers the cores when they are not in use.

I would also like to point out that 72.6 celcius is the maximum temperature according to intels thermal specifications, now your high temperatures could be the result of a few things; bad air flow in the case, CPU heatsink is not seated correctly or you are reading the temps wrong, by that I mean that you could be seeing the core (individual cores inside the actual processor which is always hotter) and not the TCase. (actual processor as a whole) What program you using to monitor temperatures?

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The only 'negative' effect I could think of is, noise. Higher fan speeds are gonna cause louder fans, which may be irritating (but who cares when you're in-game with headphones on!?) Fan life may decrease slightly, but they're made to run at the highest RPM. It's better the fan life decreasing than the CPU life :)

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Well first off I have my fans running max all the time to keep the system as cool as possible, there is no negative effects from doing this that I know of or have ever read about, to be honest it is better to keep the CPU as cool as possible to increase its life. To run the fan at max just go into the BIOS and look for the heading PC health (or something like that) and turn automatic fan to disabled, you could also (unless already enabled) enable intel speed step C1E, which lowers the cores when they are not in use.

I would also like to point out that 72.6 celcius is the maximum temperature according to intels thermal specifications, now your high temperatures could be the result of a few things; bad air flow in the case, CPU heatsink is not seated correctly or you are reading the temps wrong, by that I mean that you could be seeing the core (individual cores inside the actual processor which is always hotter) and not the TCase. (actual processor as a whole) What program you using to monitor temperatures?

 

I'm using CoreTemp which puts a nice reading in my task menu, showing the temperature of the 4 individual cores. My heatsink will be seated correctly, with a nice layer of thermal paste too. I'm using 2 of the 3 fans my case comes with, the one on the front-bottom and and the back-top. The one I'm not using is the top fan, as I don't think my mobo has enough ports for the three.

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Hey there,

I have a friend who Overclocked his CPU, I'm not sure what model he's got, I just know it's an Intel i7; the one that hasn't yet been replaced by Sandybridge, I know that when I was building mine, he suggested that I buy a fan. I'm not sure which one exactly he told me to get, but I know it was a Corsair. I would strongly suggest that you buy a fan, and a better heat sink if needed, and maybe some thermal paste. If all else fails, I would just increase the fan speed in the BIOS, but do it via trial, so don't make it spin at the top RPM instantly, increase the speed slowly to ensure it cools the CPU sufficiently, but doesn't make either too much noise, or reduce the fan speed, but remember, Fans are much, much cheaper than a new CPU.

 

Hope this helps,

Nick

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  • 1 year later...

The negative effects are:

 

- Warranty voided

- Increase in noise

- Increase in temperature

- Your parts "age" faster

- Possibility of damaging your parts

- You can overload your PSU

The OP built the computer, so it won't have a warranty for the whole PC, but on specific components. Replacing something like a CPU cooler won't void any warranty nor increase temperature, that'll decrease.

 

The negatives of increasing fan speeds, or replacing the CPU cooler is louder and decreased life in fan bearings really.

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The OP built the computer, so it won't have a warranty for the whole PC, but on specific components. Replacing something like a CPU cooler won't void any warranty nor increase temperature, that'll decrease.

 

The negatives of increasing fan speeds, or replacing the CPU cooler is louder and decreased life in fan bearings really.

The OP built the computer, so it won't have a warranty for the whole PC, but on specific components. Replacing something like a CPU cooler won't void any warranty nor increase temperature, that'll decrease.

 

The negatives of increasing fan speeds, or replacing the CPU cooler is louder and decreased life in fan bearings really.

 

I know that, but still when you overclock you lose warranty for that specific component. Check the warranty sheet you get with your components, they all say that if you cause the component to mail function by tampering with it and overclocking it, they won't accept your warranty.

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