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The "potential" customer is always right


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Good point, no? You may not always agree that the customer is right (or even that the potential one is), but if you plan on getting them to become a customer after all, you better act like they are. That doesn't mean agree with everything they say, of course, but be sure not to be argumentative, tell them they're flat out wrong, etc. You want them to feel safe in putting their money in your hands, and making them feel inferior, wrong, or stupid is usually not the best route to make that happen.

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I have a 10 minute rule with any of my customers/potentials. When/If I get a frustrating email I type out my response then minimize for about 10 minutes and work on something else. Then I come back to the email and after a few minutes to reflect on it I then retype the email and am glad I didn't sent it the first time.

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I have a 10 minute rule with any of my customers/potentials. When/If I get a frustrating email I type out my response then minimize for about 10 minutes and work on something else. Then I come back to the email and after a few minutes to reflect on it I then retype the email and am glad I didn't sent it the first time.

 

Thats funny. I just brainwash them till they hear me out. Kidding.

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I have a 10 minute rule with any of my customers/potentials. When/If I get a frustrating email I type out my response then minimize for about 10 minutes and work on something else. Then I come back to the email and after a few minutes to reflect on it I then retype the email and am glad I didn't sent it the first time.

 

That's a really good habit. I should probably do something like this more often and not just with customers, but also when responding to friends or family that are driving me nuts, ha! I do always proofread my emails that might be sensitive and will end up changing things here or there on my second or third read-through. Walking away would probably let me clear my mind a bit better, though.

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I have a 10 minute rule with any of my customers/potentials. When/If I get a frustrating email I type out my response then minimize for about 10 minutes and work on something else. Then I come back to the email and after a few minutes to reflect on it I then retype the email and am glad I didn't sent it the first time.

It's always good to relax before writing anything; especially something important to anyone like an email or private message.

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Just give them some time. I tend to get all the details from them that are important for the service I am offering them. That costs them some time, and when I suggest we should close the deal they're usually too tired for arguing and negotiating price, so they just agree. Hehe *evil brainwasher* :P

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  • 2 weeks later...

While the "potential" customer may always be right, you need to vary this based on the market. Home Depot isn't going to change their method of doing things just because one person thinks it should be a different way. On the other hand, a freelance designer should more or less do whatever they are told to do, and only give their opinion when asked. If it looks awful, it looks awful, but it's what the client wanted.

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