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5 Cs of successful blogging


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http://www.bloggingt...essful-quickly/

 

Create – Command – Creativity - Communication – Conversion

 

Really, this applies to other forms of online sites/interactions/etc, but it was set up to be aimed toward bloggers.

 

The section on "commanding" caught my attention specifically. They're right about how even if you are offering up a solution, 10k other bloggers out there are, too, and chances are, they're better at it, so replicating won't do you any good. Having a good *voice* to bring in unique viewers/readers, though, is another story.

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http://www.bloggingt...essful-quickly/

 

Create – Command – Creativity - Communication – Conversion

 

Really, this applies to other forms of online sites/interactions/etc, but it was set up to be aimed toward bloggers.

 

The section on "commanding" caught my attention specifically. They're right about how even if you are offering up a solution, 10k other bloggers out there are, too, and chances are, they're better at it, so replicating won't do you any good. Having a good *voice* to bring in unique viewers/readers, though, is another story.

 

Can you expand on that part about being commanding? I can understand what a voice is but the question is (a) how to find your own voice and (B) how to get your voice heard?

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Well the first just takes time. All too often, new bloggers try to sound like all the professionals. They imitate other voices, follow the same styles, etc, and while it's an okay start, it's nothing new or special. When it comes to finding your own voice, it's more about being you. Bring in your own stories. Bring in your own personality. Bring in your own humor or twist on things. Don't be afraid to make yourself stand out and carry on your own "voice."

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My five C's of blogging are: Create, Communicate, Correct, oh Crap and Cry a lot when it goes wrong. :D

 

Some nice thoughts in there, though I would personally replace "communicate" with "community" - communication's great when you're writing articles but the interaction with your readers is more important on a blog, IMHO.

 

And what's with the author bio? "He loves the color Red." WTF? :unknw:

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oh Crap and Cry a lot when it goes wrong. :D

 

Oh god, you're so right, heh.

 

Some nice thoughts in there, though I would personally replace "communicate" with "community" - communication's great when you're writing articles but the interaction with your readers is more important on a blog, IMHO.

 

Hmm, maybe. I think it somewhat depends on the site, though, too. There are plenty of blogs who don't even allow comments and they have no interest in creating a community exactly....but they -are- communicating to their audience. They're putting out info or humor or whatever else and getting that message across. Hmm.

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Hmm, maybe. I think it somewhat depends on the site, though, too. There are plenty of blogs who don't even allow comments and they have no interest in creating a community exactly....but they -are- communicating to their audience. They're putting out info or humor or whatever else and getting that message across. Hmm.

 

Purely personal opinion but that's "old world" blogging - the original "web log" idea, rather than modern, social blogging as it has evolved over the last 5-10 years. It's REALLY rare to see a popular blog that doesn't allow comments these days, The exceptions are ludicrously popular sites (Seth Godin, for example) and sites which are just spewing pictures and/or memes (since there's no need for commentary).

 

And neither of those are (modern definition) blogs, IMHO - they're static sites with frequent updates... which is, of course, the definition of a classic blog! I guess it comes down to how you define the terms. :D

Edited by SpikeTheLobster
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Well the first just takes time. All too often, new bloggers try to sound like all the professionals. They imitate other voices, follow the same styles, etc, and while it's an okay start, it's nothing new or special. When it comes to finding your own voice, it's more about being you. Bring in your own stories. Bring in your own personality. Bring in your own humor or twist on things. Don't be afraid to make yourself stand out and carry on your own "voice."

 

So, in simple terms, I just have to stick to being my old crappy self and I would be using my own voice. Right? Sounds like an idea. I have read a few blogs and I noticed that a first person conversational tone is more the norm than the exception. Is that part of having a voice?

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That was indeed a good article. The author was getting at how to establish your site as an authority site in your niche and I liked this approach. Communication is vital for success so having regular conversations with your audience is a must. All this would lead to better conversions which is the ultimate goal of establishing a blog.

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So, in simple terms, I just have to stick to being my old crappy self and I would be using my own voice. Right? Sounds like an idea. I have read a few blogs and I noticed that a first person conversational tone is more the norm than the exception. Is that part of having a voice?

 

Absolutely. Anybody can put out a generic article that lists the facts and move on. To have a voice would be to add your own flare, use your own style, give it personality. And yes, if you're using first person conversational tone, then it's about being your "old crappy self" that people love and want to hear talk (er, read...).

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I guess it comes down to how you define the terms. :D

 

Definitely. And you listed some great extremes, but there are also some middle grounds. There are blogs who allow comments and get a bunch of comments even....but none of the people in the comment section actually connect and form a community. They technically might be considered one, but really, they're just all fanboys/girls of the original author and could be counted as a community by default. If they're not interacting with one another and are simply showing up every so often (or maybe just once even) to leave a comment on the content itself, then isn't that more a matter of the blogger communicating....but not creating community?

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Im Sure I'd understand If I was a blogger.

But I'm Mainly a forum poster so :P

But will look into this if i ever start blogging :D

 

It's not really such a big step to go from forum posting to blogging. Think of it as making long forum posts. More or less. Of course, there are some other differences between forum posting and blogging but don't let that stop you from trying.

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Definitely. And you listed some great extremes, but there are also some middle grounds. There are blogs who allow comments and get a bunch of comments even....but none of the people in the comment section actually connect and form a community. They technically might be considered one, but really, they're just all fanboys/girls of the original author and could be counted as a community by default. If they're not interacting with one another and are simply showing up every so often (or maybe just once even) to leave a comment on the content itself, then isn't that more a matter of the blogger communicating....but not creating community?

 

So maybe it should be 6 C's. :)

 

I guess my point of contention is that communication is almost a default for blogging. If you're publishing something, you're communicating. Unless you're spinning content, of course, in which case you're doing something else...!

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So maybe it should be 6 C's. :)

 

I guess my point of contention is that communication is almost a default for blogging. If you're publishing something, you're communicating. Unless you're spinning content, of course, in which case you're doing something else...!

 

Indeed, however in order for people who have visited your site to know there is new content, your best bet is to tell them there is new content. Usually via email. Also there is communicating with people who have commented on your blog articles. A lot more than just posting up the initial content

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Owning and forum and owning a blog are the same thing. A blog is just a dummied down version of a forum which became highly poplular.

 

Eh? They're completely different animals. And a blog is not a dumbed-down version of a forum: originally it was a web log, like a change log, not a discussion medium.

 

Owning them is very different, too. Blogs are a heck of a lot easier to manage than forums, since they don't - by default - have multiple random authors. Just you. There are dozens more differences but that's the most obvious.

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Owning and forum and owning a blog are the same thing. A blog is just a dummied down version of a forum which became highly poplular.

 

Rick

 

2eb5ly1.gif

 

I can't even touch that one.

 

So maybe it should be 6 C's. :)

 

I guess my point of contention is that communication is almost a default for blogging. If you're publishing something, you're communicating. Unless you're spinning content, of course, in which case you're doing something else...!

 

To be fair, "creating" is almost a default for blogging by the same standards and assumptions of "not spinning," too, and it's still part of the 5 Cs. I do see what you're saying, though.

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Owning and forum and owning a blog are the same thing. A blog is just a dummied down version of a forum which became highly poplular.

 

Rick

 

Come now, a blog and a forum are as similar as, say, apples and oranges. True, both things involve writing but the style and the content are different even if they are about the same topic. You really need to have a good look at more blogs and more forums.

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Come now, a blog and a forum are as similar as, say, apples and oranges. True, both things involve writing but the style and the content are different even if they are about the same topic. You really need to have a good look at more blogs and more forums.

 

I own several blogs and forums. About 20 websites in all. I was referring to the basic marketing concept and the technical abilities of both.

 

Rick

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