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Jessi

Good news for the minimalists

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It depends if it has enough information to give you everything you need. For something like a Starbucks coffee then you know what your getting by the funny writing, but for something like Coke and M&Ms then don't you need that information?

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It's just a trend. Sometimes I feel that it's as sensible as a dog chasing it's own tail. Trends just go round and round without going anywhere. In a few more years, that minimalist look will be old. Then we will see another fashion take its place. Maybe in our life time, we may see this becoming the latest trend, too:

 

Kats_Dragon_Tattoo.jpg

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Lol! Mark, you could be right. After all, with the M&Ms example, not only do they not have to use nearly as much ink, but they're also able to only use a couple colors instead of using a full rainbow of inks.

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Lol! Mark, you could be right. After all, with the M&Ms example, not only do they not have to use nearly as much ink, but they're also able to only use a couple colors instead of using a full rainbow of inks.

 

There's also the whole eco-thing with that approach: minimalist design means less resources used to create the packaging (and, more importantly for them, more profit).

 

Reminds me of Repo Man, with the store with all the white boxes labelled "food", "cereals" and so on. Makes sense to me!

 

I doubt it will happen but it'd be really nice if this were the start of an anti-marketing approach to marketing. You know, lose all the pretty sparkly stuff, the heavy brainwashing and everything - and just let people choose what they really want. Yeah, I know... never gonna happen... :(

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You know, lose all the pretty sparkly stuff, the heavy brainwashing and everything - and just let people choose what they really want.

 

you may want to take a look at this then:

 

10 Corporations that control the market:

 

k0pv0.jpg

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I don't think new brands can start with a minimalistic approach. First they have to make sure people all over the world know what they are selling and only THEN can they start minimalizing. It's a gradual process that works well and moves along with company growth.

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I don't think new brands can start with a minimalistic approach. First they have to make sure people all over the world know what they are selling and only THEN can they start minimalizing. It's a gradual process that works well and moves along with company growth.

 

This is true, I agree completely with you on this one. These brands, M&Ms & Starbucks to use the ones posted at first, can definitely risk doing this. People already know what to expect and no matter how the logo looks as long as it has the main idea of the original one it will work.

 

Yes, it's true that with all the go-green campaign and what not these days these companies can definitely lean towards this style and still work and sell; while looking eco-friendly and saving some money as they go with it. But a new brand or new business can't risk it; they need to go out of the minimalistic look in order to catch the people's attention, of course it all depends on what you are trying to sell. I think some things may work if they start with a minimalistic logo/design, but it's definitely not for every brand/company to start with, most times you need to start with a "bang", once people start talking and using one thing of the logo/design to represent your brand then you can start to go towards the minimalistic look entirely.

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I don't think new brands can start with a minimalistic approach. First they have to make sure people all over the world know what they are selling and only THEN can they start minimalizing. It's a gradual process that works well and moves along with company growth.

 

I think you're right. The reason the big companies can get by with going more minimalistic now is because people already recognize them. They can strip the details and the colors/logos will still be recognizable. New companies can't do that quite as well, I don't think.

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I find minimalistic designs very useful, as they don't fill my mind with useless data and give me everything I need to still know what I'm buying. The same applies to minimalistic designs in websites, I find it much faster to browse a website if there's only some text, a few descriptive images and a small color pallete. since I don't confuse myself with other useless things.

 

But as other people have said, I guess it could be another trend too. Still, I welcome it in the supermarkets.

 

Other people said that small brands won't get recognized, but that's not true. In the case of m&m's they could just put a transparent circle or shape in the package so people can look inside it. It would still look very simplistic and easy to recognize.

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I love minimalistic designs. They get straight to the point. I'm not sure if it actually works for the company as far as noticing it goes. I would say that a minimalistic design actually sticks out more than a cluttered one. I think minimalistic designs look real clean as well whereas a cluttered design is can be hard on the eyes or you can easily look things over.

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